Will 2019 be the year of private lending?

Private lending in 2019With the release of Commissioner Hayne’s report  it’s clear that 2019 is going to bring about a number of changes to the private lending industry for lenders, brokers and borrowers alike. We take a look at how we see 2019 panning out for the private lending market.

A move towards transparency

The royal commission has destroyed borrowers’ trust in the big four banks, and now they’re looking for alternatives that offer honesty and transparency. This is an opportunity for those lenders with straight-forward and open lending processes to put their best foot forward and show borrowers that there is a genuine alternative to the mainstream banks.

Continued tightening of the purse strings

2018 saw the banks reducing their risk appetite and placing a number of restrictions on what they will lend and who to. This meant that obtaining finance became increasingly difficult for borrowers, particularly commercial borrowers. This restricted lending environment looks to continue throughout 2019, with the findings of the Hayne report recommending further regulations for the banks’ lending systems.

However, this has created a real opportunity for non-bank lenders who look at lending situations in a different light to the banks. Private lenders are able to be more flexible in who they will lend to. Rather than just look at the serviceability of the loan, they will look at the bigger picture when making a lending decision. This means that while the purse strings are tightening at the banks, more opportunities to access funding will become available through the non-bank sector.

Rise of commercial brokers

Borrowers seeking alternative lenders with transparent and flexible lending processes are going to need help. In these uncertain times, borrowers will increasingly look to brokers for guidance and advice. This is particularly the case for business borrowers who are most likely to be turned away by the banks. For this reason, it makes sense that a number of residential brokers will consider diversifying into the commercial space in order to assist this growing group of borrowers.

The year of private lending?

Overall, the changes in the lending landscape will shine a spotlight on the advantages of working with a private lender. Whether a borrower has become disillusioned with their big four bank or has had their loan application rejected, 2019 will see more and more people looking for an alternative solution for their finance needs. Private lenders have always been able to offer something different to the banks, however this year looks to be the time when the benefits of a non-bank lender really become known throughout the industry.

10 Questions For Your Private Mortgage Lender

Private Mortgages Australia gives advice on what to ask your private mortgage lender.The strict lending requirements imposed by traditional bank lenders can mean that many borrowers have trouble qualifying for a conventional mortgage. However, a private mortgage provides a smart alternative for a business borrower who can’t get finance from a bank.

Private mortgage finance usually comes from private investors or institutional funders who are willing to loan borrowers money for a business purpose using a property as security. The process can be quite complicated but choosing the right lender and knowing the right questions to ask can make a private mortgage a great option. These are some of the questions to ask your private mortgage lender.

1. What types of products do you offer?

Private mortgage lenders may offer a range of mortgages, such as caveat loans, car finance, invoice factoring, first-ranking mortgages or second-ranking mortgages. If you are looking for a specific type of loan product, check with the lender about the types of products they offer so that you can find the right type of business loan that meets your needs.

2. How quickly can you assess my application?

Private lenders are usually able to process applications much more quickly than traditional bank lenders. Generally, as long as the borrower has sufficient equity in the underlying security, a private lender may be able to approve a loan much more quickly than a traditional lender, sometimes offering pre-loan approval within a few hours.  However, be wary of lenders who advertise 24-hour loans as this is often a trap to get unsuspecting borrowers committed. These 24 hour loans are commonly also called “Caveat Loans”. Many say they ‘can’ offer loans within 24 hours, but with the amount of work that goes into a loan offer it is very unlikely that this will actually happen. Some exceptions do exist, for instance where a valuation has already been conducted by a reputable valuation firm thus reducing the need to order a new valuation and speeding up the application.

3. What interest will I pay on my mortgage?

The interest rate will vary depending on the type of loan taken out and the length of time taken to pay it back. Some lenders may advertise rates from as little as 1% per month, however borrowers should be wary of ‘from’ rates, especially when included in the indicative letter of offer, as quite often the interest rate is much higher when the actual loan offer comes back.

4. Where does the money come from?

This is a very interesting concept that very few people consider, where does a private lender actually get their money from? A lot of private lenders use a sophisticated investor networks to underwrite their loan advances. Other private lenders raise funds from wholesale or retail sources with the use of an Australian Financial Services License (‘AFSL’).

5. Who makes the lending decision?

In some cases it is the individual investor that makes the final decision to lend the funds required and will essentially “write the cheque”. This isn’t an ideal situation. Imagine that you are a borrower and you submit a loan to a private lender. Everything seems to be going well, you pay the upfront fees, order the loan documents from the solicitor, but then are taken by complete surprise when your loan application is rejected despite being formally approved. What has occurred is that the loan was approved by the ‘middle man’ but then turned down by the person writing the cheque. Unfortunately this occurs all the time.

The smarter alternative is to make sure that the private lender is the one who is making the decisions. This is a safer and more effective situation for the borrower.

6. Are there any hidden costs?

Sometimes there are additional fees that you may not be aware of upfront. Check with the private lender about any additional costs that may be conditional upon specific conditions or circumstances. Make sure you work with a well-respected lender that has a transparent lending process so you don’t get hit with any unexpected fees.

7. What are the optional features?

If you are looking for specific features, ask the lender about whether these will be offered with the mortgage. Popular features that provide convenience for borrowers include prepaid loan terms. A pre-paid loan term is where a borrower doesn’t need to service the loan payments for a specified period of time. Some lenders only offer this feature for one month. Could you imagine the strain of having to service a private loan with a higher than bank interest rates every month? This would be very difficult especially if the reason for approaching the private lender in the first place was to assist with cash-flow issues. It is very important to work with a private lender that understands this and can offer a loan term that is capitalised with reliance on an exit strategy.

8. How much can I borrow?

Generally, private mortgages can be approved for any amount range from $20,000 to $4,000,000 or more, and up to 75% of the value of the underlying security. However, a good lender will treat every loan application as a unique case and can therefore lend based on the individual circumstances.

9. Do I need security for a loan?

In most cases the lender will require real estate as security. You should have some equity built up in the property to be able to borrow against it.

10. Can I make extra repayments?

If you would like the option to make extra repayments, ask the private lender about the possibility of making extra repayments and whether a fee will be charged if you do choose to make them.

 

By Tony Barbone

Managing Director, Private Mortgages Australia